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Management Concepts & Organisational Behaviour - MANAGEMENT BY OBJECTIVES

Nature of Objectives-MANAGEMENT BY OBJECTIVES

   Posted On :  17.05.2018 10:07 pm

‘Objectives’ are the end points of management action. They provide meaning to the existence of an organisation.

Nature of Objectives
 
 
‘Objectives’ are the end points of management action. They provide meaning to the existence of an organisation. Objectives are the specific targets to be achieved by an organisation. They are the end-points towards which all management activities like organising, staffing, directing and controlling are directed. In other words, only after defining the basic objectives for which an organisation exists, can the manager determine the kind of organisation, the type of personnel and their skills, the kind of motivation and direction and the nature of control techniques which may be employed to achieve the ends.
 
Objectives may be in quantitative or qualitative terms. For example, in the areas of market standing, productivity and physical and financial resources quantification is possible. On the other hand, worker’s morale, social responsibility, etc. cannot exactly quantified. However, objectives in the latter category may be expressed in qualitative terms. Thus, quantitative objectives are gauged by ‘how much’ while qualitative objectives by ‘how well’.

Objectives have hierarchy in that objectives which have wider scope and are relevant for the whole organisation are known as enterprise objectives. These objectives are split into unit level or departmental objectives. Thus, objectives at all levels in the organisation are interrelated and form a network.
 
Short-term and Long-term Objectives: Short-term objectives are those which are sought to be achieved by the organisation in the immediate future, while long-term objectives are those which are aimed to be achieved over a longer period, say five to ten years or even more. However, both are not mutually exclusive and are interrelated.
 
Objectives sometimes may be in conflict with each other as the goals of the various departments at times may clash. Each department considers that its goals are more important. For example, the production goal of low unit cost achievable through mass production may be in conflict with the sales goal of offering high quality goods. Such conflicts have to be resolved amicably.

 

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