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Management Concepts & Organisational Behaviour - Perception And Learning

External Factors Influencing Selection - Perception And Learning

   Posted On :  18.05.2018 04:04 am

The external factors influencing selection are nature, intensity, size, contrast, repetition, motion, and novelty and familiarity.

External Factors Influencing Selection
 
 
The external factors influencing selection are nature, intensity, size, contrast, repetition, motion, and novelty and familiarity.
 

Nature

 
By this we try to understand the nature of the object. Is it a visual object? Does it have words, pictures, people or animals? Pictures attract attention more than words and a picture with human beings attracts attention more than a picture with inanimate objects. That is why cartoons and caricatures draw more attraction.
 

Intensity

 
 
The intensity principle conveys that if the external stimulus is more intense in nature, the more it is likely to be perceived by the individual. That is why people pay more attention to loud noise, strong odour or bright light. At work places, superiors speak loudly to subordinates for this reason only.
 

Size

 
 
Like intensity, size also matters very much. Larger objects are likely to be perceived more by the individuals than the smaller ones. A maintenance engineer gives greater attention to a bigger machine than a smaller one.
 

Contrast

 
 
The contrast principle suggests that the external stimulus that stands out distinctly against the background or the one that is quite unusual will receive greater attention of the people.
 

Repetition

 
 
The principle of repetition suggests that a repeated external stimulus draws more attention than a single one. The several advertisements of various products shown daily on TVs are based on the principle of repetition only. This principle also explains why supervisors have to give directions to workers repeatedly for even simple tasks.

Motion

 
 
According to this principle, people pay greater attention to moving objects rather than stationary objects. That is why advertisers create signs that incorporate moving parts.
 

Novelty and Familiarity

  
This principle states that either a novel or a familiar external situation can better serve to draw attention. New objects in familiar settings or familiar objects in new settings are likely to draw the attention of the perceiver. Job rotation is followed in organizations for this reason. For instance, workers will pay greater attention to the tasks assigned to them in the new jobs in order to prove themselves and gain acceptance in the new job.

Tags : Management Concepts & Organisational Behaviour - Perception And Learning
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