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MARKETING MANAGEMENT - Introduction to Marketing Mix

Marketing Programs - Introduction to Marketing Mix

   Posted On :  18.06.2018 01:38 am

A marketing program is made up of the various elements of the marketing mix and the relationships among them.

Marketing Programs

A marketing program is made up of the various elements of the marketing mix and the relationships among them. The concept of the marketing mix emphasizes the fit of the various pieces and the quality and size of their interactions. There are three degrees of interaction – consistency, integration and leverage. Consistency is the lack of a poor fit between two or more elements of the marketing mix. For example, to sell a high quality product through a low quality retailer would seem inconsistent. While consistency is the lack of a poor fit, integration is the presence of a positive, harmonious interaction among the elements of the mix.

For example, heavy advertising can sometimes be harmonious with a high price, because the added margin from the high price pays for the advertising and the high advertising creates the brand differentiation that justifies the high price.
 
Leverage is the situation in which each individual element of the mix is used to the best advantage in support of the total mix.
 
Once the elements of the marketing mix have met the internal tests of consistency, integration and leverage, the next step is to check that the proposed program fits the needs of the target customers, the core competencies of the company and the likely responses of key competitors.
 
The concept of program/customer fit encompasses development of a marketing program that fits the needs of the target-market segments. For that, the market must first be carefully and explicitly delineated. If the target has not been defined, it cannot be reached! The program must not only fit the market, but also fit the company. A marketing program must match the core competencies of the company that is implementing it. For example, an organization with extensive mass advertising experience and expertise is more likely to be able to carry out a program that leans heavily on advertising than an organization less strong in that particular area.
 
An effective marketing program must not only fit the company’s own core competencies, it must also take account of competitors’ programs. Competitive/program fit can be defined as the characteristic of a marketing program that, while building on a company’s strengths and shielding its weaknesses, protects it from competitors by capitalizing on their weaknesses, in the process creating a unique market personality and position.
 
Like most concepts, the marketing mix is an abstraction and real marketing programs do not always fit perfectly the product, price, place and promotion paradigm. In fact, several parts of the mix fall at the interface of two elements. For example, brand, which is often views as an aspect of product, is clearly also part of marketing communications and can serve to help coordinate product policy and communication. 
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