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Human Resources Management - Career Development

Career Anchors and Career Stages - Career Development

   Posted On :  13.06.2018 09:29 pm

There are distinct patterns of self-perceived talents, attitudes, motives and values that guide and stabilize a person’s career after the initial years of earning real-world work experience and feedback. These patterns are called as Career Anchors.

Career Anchors


There are distinct patterns of self-perceived talents, attitudes, motives and values that guide and stabilize a person’s career after the initial years of earning real-world work experience and feedback. These patterns are called as Career Anchors. These anchors provide a growing area of stability within the individual’s attitudes, which anchors the interpretation of career and life options. Typical career anchors include those of technical competence, managerial competence, security and autonomy. These anchors affect considerably the way individuals see themselves, their jobs and their organizations. For example, some employees using a technical competence anchor get concerned mainly with technical tasks. They refuse to become involved in aspects of managerial tasks.

Career Stages


There are four major career stages according to experts on career management. During the first stage there is considerable exploration. The young employee searches for an identity and undergoes considerable self-examination and role tryouts. This stage usually results in taking a number of different jobs and is in general, a very unstable and relatively unproductive period in the person’s career. At the end of the phase, a career statement emerges based on the crystallization of an individual’s views of themselves. For example, Human Resource Management aspirants begin to view themselves as sound in human relationships, labour laws and recruitment practices.
 
In the second stage, establishment, the employee begins to settle down and indicates a need for intimacy. This is usually a growing productive period in the employee’s career. The third stage of maintenance occurs when the person levels off at a highly productive but plain period with little growth. At this stage the person has a need for generativity, which is nothing but a concern to leave something to the next generation. This need often leads the person to assume a paternalistic or mentor role with younger subordinate. The person may either have a growth spurt or become stagnant and decline during this career stage. The final stage is decline, when the person gradually gives up his active participation in official life. 
Tags : Human Resources Management - Career Development
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